A Journalistic Era Came To An End When Charles Osgood Singed-Off Of CBS Sunday Morning

 

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New York (Storch Report) — It was a sad day Sunday Morning when fans witnessed Charles Osgood signing off with his signature line, “see you on the radio.”

Yes an era of journalism ended when he departed CBS Sunday Morning today, a period that once represented trust, impartiality and a voice of reason in journalism, which no longer exists on CBS or any of the other networks.

Osgood was part of a cadre of reporters that began with the legendary anchor Edward R. Murrow in the infancy of television followed by ‘Uncle’ Walter Cronkite who introduced impartiality and trust to reporting, then on 60 Minutes, hard news was interspersed with the wry essays of Andy Rooney who would tell us in minutes of satire, the trivially life frustrations of groceries, relatives and family, while Charles Kuralt took us On the Road with small town stories of back wood towns and do so in his own avuncular and unquenchable curious style, yes, and then came along Charles Osgood with  his entertaining folksiness. And, he was as much an entertainer as he was a journalist with his piano, banjo and singing.

We allowed all of these CBS alumni into our living rooms like an old shoe.  

Somehow the new shoes of journalism don’t seem to fit anymore.

It was an era of journalism that has been hard to sustain today, perhaps because no one has time for it anymore, a period where the facts were as important as the telling of a good story, rather than a story some might want to hear and the characters of those days could fade into being legends in their own time, much like General MacArthur. 

It was a fun show all 1 hr and a half of it, filled with Osgood vignettes of the past produced by CBS with accolades by his peers.  When asked he said, “nothing gives me more satisfaction than Sunday Morning.”

Sunday Morning is in it’s 37th year, Charles Osgood is the second host succeeding Kuralt, and he signed off in his 22nd year, being a staple of Sunday morning breakfast from its inception.

Nostalgic vignettes were interspersed throughout the lengthy show, which seemed too short to absorb its significance, but perhaps too long for today’s millenniums.

One segment took us to the Osgood’s charming villa on the coast of France overlooking the French Mediterranean where Charles says a lot of naps take place.

He said “the naps take place after lunch and run up until cocktail hour.”  

The Osgood’s have 5 children and 3 grandchildren and they are all looking forward to Charles getting back to making breakfast.  His specialty was pancakes and they haven’t had any in 22 years.

He was asked what the next chapter was and he described it as being “different tomorrows.”

He has already built a mini broadcast station in that French Villa so he can continue broadcasting the Osgood Files on CBS.

One thing is for sure in the ‘different tomorrows’ is that one of Osgood’s signature and somewhat outlandish bow ties will also be retired — to the Smithsonian.

His successor will be Jane Pawley (65) a correspondent on Sunday Morning, well known anchor, host of the Today Show, fine journalist that has proven to be a survivor in the cut throat business of network TV. Whether the show will be the same, only time will tell.

Meanwhile Charlie, ‘see you on the radio.’

 

 

 

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One Response to A Journalistic Era Came To An End When Charles Osgood Singed-Off Of CBS Sunday Morning

  1. CharlieD says:

    Thank you for your comments on the fitting tribute to Charles Osgood as he said goodbye on CBS Sunday Morning yesterday. Alas, as you said, broadcast journalism has for the most part gone in a different direction — probably to satisfy the short attention span of today’s listeners. Good story telling is an art, which Osgood and his predecessors had perfected. I’m with you in hoping that the show’s producers will continue to maintain the “old shoe” style of Kuralt & Osgood.

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